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10 Key HR Metrics for Nonprofits

10 Key HR Metrics for Non-profits
Written by shailesh@civihr.org - 20 Nov 2018 Category: Non-profit Challenges

HR Metrics are numbers that allow organisations to measure the effectiveness of people management practices and improve competitiveness as an employer. They are also known as scorecards, benchmarks, or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs).

HR Metrics are numbers that allow organisations to measure the effectiveness of people management practices and improve competitiveness as an employer. They are also known as scorecards, benchmarks, or Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). HR Metrics are of particular importance to non-profits, who rely on human capital to drive their mission. Many non-profit are unaware of this need and hence we will demystify it for you.

 

How Will HR Metrics Help Me?

Metrics act as a goal.

If you are suffering from high attrition, you may want to keep the goal of ‘less than 10% turnover in the next 12 months’. Such a goal will force you to put in place measures to reduce attrition. Without an objective goal, even a well-crafted attrition reduction strategy will be difficult to measure.

Metrics help in managerial decisions.

If you observe that after rolling out your ‘Each One Teach One’ programme six months ago, the number of lessons delivered has increased 30%, it means that the programme has been a growth driver and must continue. Overlooking such metrics may result in haphazard decision making regarding the fate of the programme.

Metrics are a great team-engagement tool.

When organisational goals are numerically defined and known to the team, everyone understands how their work contributes to the overall objective. If your goal is to decrease first-year resignation rate by 10%, older employees are more likely to work closely with newer employees to mentor them and to resolve their concerns which may otherwise result in resignations.

 

Which HR Metrics Should I Track?

It is challenging to pick the exact set of metrics for any organisation. You should pick metrics that measure your goals or provide you with some insights about matters otherwise unknown. Metrics also depend on your mission. Metrics for a natural history museum’s subjective mission “to advance human understanding of science” are poles apart from a hospital’s objective mission “to provide medical care to patients suffering from dementia”. That being said, here are the top 10 HR metrics that will make sense to non-profits, when it comes to assessing people management practices.

Cost Per Hire

What does it cost you to hire one employee/one volunteer? The cost can be in terms of money, time, or efforts. You may want to compare the costs of different time periods or hiring practices.

Employee Retention Rate

Out of 100 employees hired, how many stay with me at the end of, say, one year? You may want to compare metrics with different time frames to know how your employees behave as they spend more time in your non-profit.  This is a key data point that can also be combined with other metrics, e.g. Employee Net Promoter Score, to gain advanced insights.

Average Tenure of Volunteers

Similar to the above metric, it is important to know how long a particular volunteer stays with you. Most non-profits have a significant number of volunteers, and it is useful to know how much productivity can be expected from an average volunteer.

The Ratio of Volunteers and Employees

How many volunteers do I have for 100 employees? Depending on the nature of your work, you may want to target a particular ratio. For example, for a hospital, which requires an employee base with special expertise, a low Volunteer/Employee ratio can be sufficient. In contrast, for a non-profit with a mission of environmental conservation, a high Volunteer/Employee ratio is of critical importance.

Demographics of Employees/Volunteers

It is critical to know the age, gender, education qualification, salary etc data for all your team. Non-profits must try to find trends in this data. For example, if you realise that 60% of your volunteers are females in the age group of 18-22, you know whom to target while growing your volunteer base.

Employee Satisfaction Rate/Employee Net Promoter Score

How likely are my employees to recommend me as an employer to their family and friends? This may be tricky data to capture, but frequent employee interaction and one-on-one meetings with managers can help non-profits come up with a reasonable estimate of this metric.

Absenteeism Rate

How many of my employees are absent on an average on any given day? Who are the employees with top 10% of leaves? This data can help non-profits identify the problem of regular absenteeism and deal with it in time.

NOTE: CiviHR’s Reports functionality allows non-profits to derive this insight from leave data. You may read more here or sign up here for a trial.

Training Effectiveness Rate

How many of my employees underwent training and are now competent in new areas? This metric is of much use during the appraisal process - to assess employee growth as well as training quality.

Percent of Performance Goals Met

Another key metric in the appraisal process is: how many of my employees met their performance targets identified at the start of the year/quarters? This data needs to be carefully tracked, but when available, it drastically simplifies the appraisal process.

Beneficiary Per Employee

This is a mission-driven metric. How many beneficiaries do I have for one employee? There may not be a direct relationship between the number of employees and beneficiaries, but over a period of time, this metric will allow you to see whether your growing team size is enabling you to contribute to more beneficiaries. This information can optimise your recruitment policies, as well as operations.

 

How Do I Get Started?

After identifying metrics that are suitable for your non-profit, it is now time to track them, with a start and end date in mind. It may take a bit of planning to implement data tracking as a regular practice, but the rewards are promising. So all the best with your first step in the direction of an optimally run non-profit team!

 

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This post is the next in the series of addressing specific challenges non-profits face, and builds on top of earlier posts such as acquiring the right talent, employee retention strategies., and workplace culture.

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CiviHR is a philanthropic project funded by a charitable foundation, on a mission to create a best-in-class people management solution for organisations that deliver social good. You may read more here or sign up here for a trial.

5 Best Onboarding Practices for Nonprofits

Efficient Onboarding is essential to convert new hires into loyal employees.
Written by shailesh@civihr.org - 06 Nov 2018 Category: Non-profit Challenges

Non-profits heavily rely on people to carry out their mission. How often do you feel that certain tasks are falling by the wayside just because your team member looking after them is no longer with you?

Non-profits heavily rely on people to carry out their mission. How often do you feel that certain tasks are falling by the wayside just because your team member looking after them is no longer with you? And such challenges are more mind-numbing when your team is fast changing because of high employee churn or when you have a huge number of volunteers. Luckily, a well-structured onboarding practice can help you convert new hires into loyal employees!

Why Is Onboarding Important?

  • Research suggests that the non-profit employee turnover rate is 19%.

  • A large percentage of this churn happens in the first three months.

  • New hires, when subjected to an efficient onboarding programme, are 69% more likely to remain in the company after three years.

  • A large percentage of non-profits work with volunteers for whom onboarding is the primary means of knowledge transfer.

What do all these facts suggest? It can be easily inferred that an effective onboarding practice can reduce team churn and associated recruitment costs, while also setting up your employees for long-term success, for themselves as well as your organisation. A good onboarding practice is the one that engages employees early on, builds trust, fosters relationships, and builds your organisation’s brand.

How Do I Build A Great Onboarding Practice?

Onboarding is often confused with orientation, which typically happens on the first few days and comprises of the task and team introduction. This is not sufficient - onboarding must involve open communication, frequent feedback and assessment, as well as the redressal of any concerns the new team member may have. This implies that onboarding needs to be a more structured, planned activity, much like a project. But don’t worry! It is not as challenging as it may seem in the beginning, so long as you stick to a few key principles.

Create an Onboarding Schedule

An effective onboarding plan keeps different timelines and priorities for different tasks. Logistics i.e. email set up, desk assignment, paperwork etc are the highest priority for Day 1 and must typically be completed in the first three days. Team orientation, project details, reporting mechanism etc need to be considered next and must start in the first week. Company history, values, mission, objectives etc are important too, but can wait for the more immediate items to get over. This is just one way of looking at it - how you want to structure onboarding items is entirely up to you, but the key is to have a structure and follow it.

Make it Personal

Onboarding needs to be made personal. The overarching idea is to make new team members feel welcome and valued. Talk to them as individuals, and get to know their stories, family background, personal goals etc. Talk about yourself and your role, and tell them what you like about the organisation and its people. You may also want to give them some insider tips, facts, and jokes, to make them feel like one of your own. And yes, be creative; after all, it is a human-to-human interaction that we are talking about!

Create a Buddy System

Since the onboarding process can go over a long time - typically six months or even a year - it is impossible for one individual to keep track of everything. So to delegate tasks and also to foster genuine peer relationships, establish a Buddy system. Assign a Buddy to a new employee - a Buddy is typically a peer who works closely with new hires and helps them whenever they get stuck. A Buddy is not necessarily a Manager or a Mentor or even someone with greater position or authority - a Buddy is purely a helping hand so the new member does not feel lost. The system can do wonders in terms of building your organisation’s culture.

Review the Onboarding Process At Regular Intervals

An onboarding process, however well structured in theory, will not work unless it is measured and corrected at regular intervals. After a week of a new member joining, you may want to check if all the logistics are taken care of. If not, evaluate where the gap is and fix it for the next time. Repeat the assessment after a week, a month, three months, whatever timelines you decide. Have an open discussion with the employee after three months. What does he/she feel, like, dislike? What does he/she think needs improvement? These may not be official or one-time conversations. Just titbits of watercooler chats can do the job as well.

Use Technology

And yes, use technology to do all of the above! As mentioned earlier, onboarding is a regular exercise, always a work in progress, and needs to be planned well. Keep track of all onboarding items via a tracking tool. Delegate desk assignment to the Office Manager, assign email creation task to the IT Team, apprise the Manager of the new member’s joining date, ensure that all the paperwork is completed by Day 3, let the Buddy know about his tasks during Week 1, schedule an informal interview after a month! See how the onboarding checklist suddenly bulges into a huge to-do list? You don’t want to miss any of these items though, so ensure that you use an effective technology tool. One tool we recommend is CiviHR’s workflows, which is particularly aligned with standardised tasks such as onboarding processes, among other things. (You may read more here or sign up here.)

Lastly, you need to understand that onboarding is not the sole responsibility of the HR or the Manager; it is an organisational practice. The more thoughts your team puts into the onboarding process, the better it will evolve to be. For now, however, the above pointers are a great starting place!

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This post is the next in the series of addressing specific challenges non-profits face, and builds on top of earlier posts such as acquiring the right talent, employee retention strategies., and workplace culture.

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CiviHR is a philanthropic project funded by a charitable foundation, on a mission to create a best-in-class people management solution for organisations that deliver social good. You may read more here or sign up here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

CiviHR’s Workflows: Easy, Error free, Time saving!

Written by shailesh@civihr.org - 02 Nov 2018 Category: Feature release

Imagine how often HR Admins find themselves in this situation. You are busy the whole day in meetings, but you keep reminding yourself of one task to be done before you call it a day.

Imagine how often HR Admins find themselves in this situation. You are busy the whole day in meetings, but you keep reminding yourself of one task to be done before you call it a day. You need to make sure that the new employees joining tomorrow have everything set up for them - their email IDs are created, desks are assigned, managers are informed, and documents are verified, among other things. Sure, you have an onboarding checklist, but it takes some time to set things up for each joinee. And when they join in bulk, typically after recruitment drives, you find yourself spending too much time doing this task. There has to be a better way - something easy, error-free, and time-saving!

CiviHR’s Workflows are the answer you have been looking for. Workflows are essentially a group of steps that constitute a standard task. Workflows can be of much use in joining formalities, as seen above, as well as other common sets of tasks - exiting formalities, promotions and contract changes, re-joining after long leaves, you name it. Workflows have been an integral part of CiviHR. They require a one-time setup and can be repeatedly used to delegate and schedule tasks.

How Do Workflows Help Me?

There are a number of ways in which workflows are advantageous.

Workflows help you be on top of the tasks.

Once a workflow is assigned, its tasks and documents can be easily tracked from your dashboard. You no longer have to worry about gathering information from various sources to track each task separately.

Workflows are error-free.

Without workflow, even if you are following a well-made standardised checklist, some human errors are likely to pop up once in a while. Workflows prevent this unwanted scenario because they are automated and there is no way of missing any steps.

Setting up and using workflows are super-easy.

To set up a workflow, pull up a task or a document, mention its due date, make an assignee, and you are done. To use a workflow, assign the workflow to the appropriate staff, and all tasks, along with their details, due date, assignee etc, are lined up in one click.

Workflows come with the useful feature of default assignees.

Let’s take the care of the joining workflow again. For a new joinee, one of the joining workflow tasks is for the Line Manager to assign a desk before the new joinee shows up. If you have 10 new joinees from different teams to take care of, you don’t have to look up 10 different Line Managers and assign them tasks individually. The workflow can be configured such that desk assignment task gets default-assigned to each new joinee’s Line Manager. You don’t have to worry about who those managers are. Now that is a real time-saver!

In conclusion, workflows take away the complexity of managing, assigning, tracking regular tasks. It is a nifty tool that can make a huge difference to you, by saving time, taking off pressure, and ensuring no mistakes. It is worth trying and you can quickly sign up for CiviHR’s six-month free trial here!

About CiviHR

CiviHR is a project to create affordable HR software for non-profit organisations. By developing open source technology the benefits can be shared with non-profits everywhere.

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CiviHR is a project to create affordable HR software for non-profit organisations. By developing open source technology the benefits can be shared with non-profits everywhere. 

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